How To: Fill in Ugly Bare Spots on Your Christmas Tree

Fill in Ugly Bare Spots on Your Christmas Tree

How to Fill in Ugly Bare Spots on Your Christmas Tree

You've found the perfect tree—or so you think. As hard as we try to display an ideal tree each year, both plastic and pine can disappoint, especially when you're shopping on the cheap.

Whether you use an artificial or authentic Christmas tree, sometimes you discover gaping, branchless holes amid its fluffy needles upon setting it up. Before you give up and stuff a few ornaments in those bare spots, you might want to break out the garland, because it's the perfect substitute for that missing greenery.

Use Pine Garland to Fill in Holes

For an artificial tree, a strand or two of fake pine garland can perfectly cover the empty areas. Not only will the plastic pine add fullness, but chances are it may also match the color and texture of your tree. Visitors won't even notice the difference.

(1) Before: Lots of little holes. (2) After: Looks like a full tree. Images via Fake-It-Frugal

You could also use pine picks and other types of green garland, as long as they match the color of your Christmas tree.

You Can Use Green Tinsel, Too

While tinsel is shiny, sparkly strands of metallic garland, it's not really as eye-catching as you'd think. Just make sure you get green tinsel that matches your tree's color.

One large strand of green tinsel garland should be enough. Image by Corinna Ashley/For My Love Of

Once you've secured the best possible match, just layer the tinsel into the bare spot. Wrapping tinsel around each branch can fill out even the barest, least-fluffed fake trees. Just make sure to look for green tinsel that's a dull dark green rather than metallic. The really bright stuff will only catch light and draw attention to your hiding tactics.

Of course, if you're not worried about a little sparkle and shine, you could use silver or brightly colored tinsel to fill in the holes of your fake tree. The extra material can add the same fullness, but is a more obvious form of camouflage.

This works best with a non-green tree. Image via Aunt Peaches

But What About Real Christmas Trees?

For those of you buying a real tree this year, all of the above tips will work just as well as they do with fake trees. Even more so if you plan on adding a lot of Christmas lights and ornaments.

Tree lots often have spare branches that have been cut off of other trees, so ask around at your closest lot to see if you can have some. You can also look at the lot's ground to grab any branches that have fallen off. If you prefer an especially fluffy tree, you can purchase a garland made of fresh pine and gently layer it into the holes.

Trim off the bottom row, cut them up, and place them in the bare spots. Image via Denise Designed

If all else fails, you could always snip some of the bottom branches off your tree to fill in the top sections. Just make sure everything is evened out, and keep in mind that any fresh pine branches that are detached from the tree will die sooner than the rest.

Cover image via Shutterstock

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